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Thread: Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships

  1. #1
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    I have a Question Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships

    I'm thinking of a few examples there are more, if you know of any . . .

  2. Press & Pete Maravich at LSU
  3. Wally & Jon English at Tulane
  4. Jessie & Jared Evans at Louisiana
  5. Nelson & Brandon Stokley at Louisiana

    I ask because just around the corner we may have
    Tony & Justin Robichaux; Baseball
    Rickey & Brad Bustle; Football

    Good, Bad or Irrelevant? I ask because it seems to be there is a relationship between the end of a career and coaching ones son. Even when successful there seems to be a burnout factor.

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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    Homer and Bryce Drew at Valparaiso.


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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    I can think of was Mike Martin, Jr. at FSU. That seemed to work well. The U. of So. FL coach has two sons on the roster. Neither is pulling their weight on the field, irritating people around the program. The Clemson coach has a kid on the roster, but he's a bench sitter.

    If the player can help the team, its worth trying to work out, If he doesn't mind playing for dad. Some players just don't want to play for dad. If he keeps it up, he might turn pro.


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    UL Baseball Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long t

    The thing that you have to understand is that no matter how good Justin is, there will always be those people who say that the only reason that he is playing is because his dad is the coach. It happens in little league, high school, all the way to the college level. This is just hearsay, but the word is that he wants to play in the SEC at any school except UL-BR so that he can shove it up their !%$ I have had the honor of playing as well as coaching against Justin, and he is the real deal. I hope that he is successful where ever he goes and that one day we'll be watching him in Omaha or maybe even a big league park.


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    UL Football Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    FYI

    Brad Bustle is going to Southeastern in Hammond.

    Also, Frank Beamer's son played for Virginia Tech. He's now an assistant at Miss. St.

    Each situation is different.


  10. #6
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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    In my opinion, i think it works out ok in most sports except for football! Football is so much more of an emotional sport and the high and lows that players experience during games, practice, meetings, etc. I think it is probably best the dad is not their to be yelling at his son! Lets face it, in football, everyone gets yelled at and taunted by coach...at least on the high school level and I am sure it isnt to far off in the college level.


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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    I belive it can work it just depends on the father and son. The biggest thing is seperating what happens on the job (the sport) from what is going on in their personal lives.


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    UL Football Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    I agree with you guys. It seems more difficult to be a coach and have a son/daughter to coach.

    When I coached my son's teams in grammer & high school, I made certain that another coach coached him.

    I don't see a problem at UL


  13. #9
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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    The biggest thing is for neither the father nor the son to take advantage of the situation. If neither does, then the situation is usually a good one.


  14. #10
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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    Quote Originally Posted by CDeb
    The biggest thing is for neither the father nor the son to take advantage of the situation. If neither does, then the situation is usually a good one.
    Playing for my Dad was a blast because he was not my direct coach. Having him on the other side of the ball (WR vs DB) made practice fun everyday. He did a great job of never coaching me, but always motivating me. For example, if I dropped a pass in practice... he'd say "Beat him up ball" or "God bless your mother!" haha

    It really depends on the scrutiny that the Father places on the Son...I think. If the dad is ultra critical and easily disappointed... then the kid will never reach his potential IMO

    hope yall are enjoying the 100 degree weather down South. It just hit 90 for the first time up here in NY City! Geaux Cajuns

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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long t

    Quote Originally Posted by jdebaillon
    The thing that you have to understand is that no matter how good Justin is, there will always be those people who say that the only reason that he is playing is because his dad is the coach. It happens in little league, high school, all the way to the college level. This is just hearsay, but the word is that he wants to play in the SEC at any school except UL-BR so that he can shove it up their !%$ I have had the honor of playing as well as coaching against Justin, and he is the real deal. I hope that he is successful where ever he goes and that one day we'll be watching him in Omaha or maybe even a big league park.
    Justin gave a verbal commitment to the Cajuns only 2 weeks ago to play baseball. He might stay close to home and be a nice addition to the Cajuns.

  16. #12

    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long t

    Quote Originally Posted by jdebaillon
    The thing that you have to understand is that no matter how good Justin is, there will always be those people who say that the only reason that he is playing is because his dad is the coach. It happens in little league, high school, all the way to the college level. This is just hearsay, but the word is that he wants to play in the SEC at any school except UL-BR so that he can shove it up their !%$ I have had the honor of playing as well as coaching against Justin, and he is the real deal. I hope that he is successful where ever he goes and that one day we'll be watching him in Omaha or maybe even a big league park.
    that hearsay is just that and not worth the breath and time it took to say it trust me, but believe what you will.....and people saying that he's playing because his dad is the coach! well, i wouldn't worry about that and the people who would say that don't know what's going on anyway.

  17. #13
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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine

    Good, Bad or Irrelevant? I ask because it seems to be there is a relationship between the end of a career and coaching ones son. Even when successful there seems to be a burnout factor.
    It depends on their relationship. Sometimes the dad can be harder on the kid to show that he's not playing favorites. Even the perception of playing favorites can lead to dissension with the other players.

  18. #14
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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    What nobody has mention yet about Justin is that he could get drafted and not play college ball at all.


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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long t

    Quote Originally Posted by Crowley Cajun
    It depends on their relationship. Sometimes the dad can be harder on the kid to show that he's not playing favorites. Even the perception of playing favorites can lead to dissension with the other players.
    Well, said. I played FB in HS and my dad was an asst. coach. The first 2 years he didn't coach me. But the next 2 years he did and he bent over backwards to make SURE no one thought that I got any favors from him. It was pretty harsh at times. I don't really recommend it if you are the situation I was in. My dad & I didn't really see eye-to-eye on much until I was MUCH older. For others, I can see where it could be good. I think it really depends on the situation. Best of luck to Justin. I'd love to see him in a Cajun uniform, but I hope he does what is best for himself.

  20. #16

    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long t

    Quote Originally Posted by jdebaillon
    The thing that you have to understand is that no matter how good Justin is, there will always be those people who say that the only reason that he is playing is because his dad is the coach. It happens in little league, high school, all the way to the college level. This is just hearsay, but the word is that he wants to play in the SEC at any school except UL-BR so that he can shove it up their !%$ I have had the honor of playing as well as coaching against Justin, and he is the real deal. I hope that he is successful where ever he goes and that one day we'll be watching him in Omaha or maybe even a big league park.
    In my opinion, it is Mrs. Robichaux that will have the toughest time with this situation. Regardless of where the young man plays, her faith and love for her family will be what keeps this family as solid as they have always been. She raised these two men right!

  21. #17
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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long t

    Quote Originally Posted by sportswatcher
    In my opinion, it is Mrs. Robichaux that will have the toughest time with this situation. Regardless of where the young man plays, her faith and love for her family will be what keeps this family as solid as they have always been. She raised these two men right!
    You are correct it will be tough for Mrs. Robichaux...She only raised one man right the other(TONY) was raised right on his end...

  22. #18
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    Default Re: Do Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships work for the good of the team (long term)

    Father/Daughter Jeff and Leigh Hennessy Gymnastics/Trampoline was another Coach/Player combo at UL and it seemed to work, although Jeff's passion for the sport seemed to start slowing after Leigh was gone.

    There is a great UL family connections page on the Athletic Network LINK


  23. UL Football UL's Bustle gets chance to coach son this season


     
    UL — Unlike the sons of some college head football coaches, Brad Bustle wasn’t initially sure if he wanted to play under the scrutiny of a father’s watchful eye.

    However it soon became evident that Bustle knew exactly where he wanted to be, even if it meant spending a season as a walk-on at the University of Louisiana.

    Bustle, the son of ULL football coach Rickey Bustle, is starting 2006 as a backup offensive lineman and no longer indecisive about playing for his father, who starts his fifth year at the school.

    Both son and father were at ULL’s athletic complex on Sunday as 105 players — 82 on scholarship — underwent team meetings and physicals before starting preseason practices today at 8:45 a.m.

    Initially, Brad Bustle enrolled at Southeastern Louisiana University in 2005 and planned to play college football there.

    “I didn’t sign a scholarship (at SLU) early on, but I felt that I could get one as the season went on,” Brad said, who played along the defensive line at Lafayette High.

    After several practices at SLU, Bustle knew where he wanted to be and it wasn’t in an SLU uniform.

    The rest of the story



    By BOB ARDOIN
    Special to The Advocate



  24. #20
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    Default Re: Father-Son / Coach-Player relationships

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine
    I'm thinking of a few examples there are more, if you know of any . . .

  25. Press & Pete Maravich at LSU
  26. Wally & Jon English at Tulane
  27. Jessie & Jared Evans at Louisiana
  28. Nelson & Brandon Stokley at Louisiana
  29. Nelson & David Schexnayder (Dissimilar but mentionable)

    I ask because just around the corner we may have
    Tony & Justin Robichaux; Baseball
    Rickey & Brad Bustle; Football

    Good, Bad or Irrelevant? I ask because it seems to be there is a relationship between the end of a career and coaching ones son. Even when successful there seems to be a burnout factor.
  30. If the situation did not involve coaches, Robichaux and Bustle, I would not know what to think. In the case of these two gentlemen, I believe that they considered the consequences, probably consulted with their coaching staffs and sought the advice of others outside their staffs before allowing their sons to become part of their team.

    Both of these gentlemen, I feel, realize that they will be living in a "public fish bowl", and certainly do not want to taint their reputations with charges of favoritism to their sons.

    In my particular case, I have bigger worries than that of these two young men playing for their fathers.

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