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Thread: UL use of the color Vermilion ( hue study )

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    SLII 1901-1921 UL use of the color Vermilion ( hue study )


    Times-Picayune
    Jan. 17, 1902
    SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA INDUSTRIAL

    The football game announced in these columns last week between the Institute team and the boys of St. Landry was played on the institute campus last Saturday afternoon. The Opelousas team brought with them many friends to yell and "root" for their eleven. Lafayette was ablaze with vermilion the institute color. . . .



    On the subject of Louisiana's school colors "Vermilion" and white, there may be older mentions, but as of now the article above from the Times-Picayune is the oldest I have found that mentions Louisiana’s colors.

    This mention was reported just one day shy of the 4 month mark from when the University of Louisiana (SLII) opened it's doors for the first time on Sept. 18th 1901.

    Since the football game mentioned was the very first played next to the Swamp on campus and in the town of Lafayette. It is safe to assume that the color "Vermilion" has been the one and only color of choice for the University of Louisiana for its entire 105 years of sports history.

    What has not been etched in stone is the exact which shade of vermilion that was used. This is due the fact that “Vermilion” covers a wide range from a somewhat deep red (not burgundy, although burgundy has been used during Louisiana's history), down the spectrum to being a reddish orange, all the way to what some call translucent vermilion, although this is usually produced with a brush fade.

    The deep vivid red is sometimes referred to as Chinese Vermilion, which is vivid and deeper in hue. The reddish orange version of vermilion is often referred to as French Vermilion. In between the two sits the “Vermilion” hue, a near perfect balance between the two.

      
    link to original swatch page go to the very bottom of page.

    I would suggest the more historical the shade the more likely it was the shade used when the University of Louisiana opened in 1901 probably French Vermilion.

    This is a swatch that is produced from the mineral cinnabar if you follow the link below you will see that cinnabar itself comes in different hues

    Link

    "It is the bright red of Monet's painting, a dense, opaque color used by Rembrandt and Titian; it is found on paintings from Byzantium, the Roman Empire and in Egypt, in the West and in the East - yet looking for the real thing in an art supply store today can be more difficult than finding decent bagels in Nebraska. It is the pigment that has all but disappeared, the color that has more alchemical lore attached to it than any other, the heaviest paint on the artists' palette: Vermilion. As we trace its origins and uses, its cultural and economcal significance, the story of how this color appeared only to vanish once again will make us into linguists of pigment. It will take us on a journey through time until we end up in a medieval town in the southern tip of Tuscany which is home to a slowly decomposing monument to what used to be the booming industry of mercury mining."...


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    Vermilion, like all colors, is a range of hues.

    It is bright red to bright orangish red.

    So a couple of points to make:
    1) Why do you have school colors? So you can tell your team from the others.

    2) Red & white, and variations of it, are the most common colors in college sports.

    3) Unique colors are marketing-- and pride-- bonanzas. Say you're in Beijing, and the guy in front of you in line is wearing a burnt orange jersey. What school does he support?

    Now try these:
    Light blue?

    Light blue & gold?

    Navy & bright yellow (maize)?

    Orange & Green?

    Green & Blue?

    (Answers: Texas, UNC, Michigan, Miami, Tulane)

    Now, there are only a few such schools you can name, because only a few have unique colors.

    Well, of the 2200 4-year colleges & universities in the country, only 1 has vermilion for a color.

    So what good is it to have a unique color by name, but use the same shade of red that some other school uses? No good reason. It does nothing for us.

    So if we're going to have a unique color, it needs to be a unique color.

    My yardstick is, when you're not sure if it's red or orange, that's what we want. We want something that will make people look twice, and will identify our supporters anywhere.

    And it fits. Orange-red is the color of boiled crabs; crawfish bisque; Tabasco sauce and Tabasco peppers; new fiddles; ripe tomates; sauce piquant; swamp sunrises and bayou sunsets; and you can probably think of a few others yourself.


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    Isn't this striking?

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    Wow.

    A picture is worth a thousand words.

    Good Lord, Turbine, is that one of your photographs? We need to do something with that. It's gorgeous.

    And yes, it is quite definitely Vermilion.

    BTW, once when I came on here, I saw a great photo of a pelican flying, but I've never seen it again. ???


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    Default Re: Studying the Historical Color, Vermilion

    This Spalding cover from 1913 is what I think of as Vermilion and White

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    Default Re: Studying the Historical Color, Vermilion

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine
    This Spalding cover from 1913 is what I think of as Vermilion and White.
    NICE!

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    Track & Field Vermillion

    This is what the color is in case anyone is confused about it...Sindoor is Vermillion.

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    Default Re: Vermillion

    Quote Originally Posted by drumroll View Post
    This is what the color is in case anyone is confused about it...Sindoor is Vermillion.

    Wow... that IS vermilion.

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    Default Re: Vermillion

    Quote Originally Posted by drumroll View Post
    _ This is what the color is in case anyone is confused about it...Sindoor is Vermillion.
    That is VIVID.

    The thing is that Sindoor (powder I guess you call it) is a raw material. When the paint oils are added, it darkens up a bit even when dried.

    On a side note I can't find one historical use of the color Vermilion that is a consistent shade through and through. So for me Vermilion is a range of hues and is not tied down to a single shade or number.

    jmo

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    Track & Field Re: Vermillion

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine View Post
    _ That is VIVID.

    The thing is that Sindoor (powder I guess you call it) is a raw material. When the paint oils are added, it darkens up a bit even when dried.

    On a side note I can't find one historical use of the color Vermilion that is a consistent shade through and through. So for me Vermilion is a range of hues and is not tied down to a single shade or number.

    jmo _
    Sindoor is actually a sort of makeup that is ancient in origin and widely used by Hindu women. It is not mixed with "oils", but rather tumeric-lime and mercury. This mixture certainly makes for an "interesting" tradition when you consider it's a must for married women to wear and signifies their desire for their husband's longevity. "Interesting"? The combination of Sindoor, tumeric-lime, and mercury from a medicinal perspective, not only helps control the blood pressure of the wife, but activates her sex drive as well. This may explain why Widows do not customarily wear it...


    Perhaps we should consider offering Sindoor face paint to our significant others on gameday?

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    Default Re: Vermillion

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine View Post
    That is VIVID.

    The thing is that Sindoor (powder I guess you call it) is a raw material. When the paint oils are added, it darkens up a bit even when dried.

    On a side note I can't find one historical use of the color Vermilion that is a consistent shade through and through. So for me Vermilion is a range of hues and is not tied down to a single shade or number.

    jmo
    Sure, that's the point I usually try to make... all colors are a range.

    But the U needs to defind a color number. Since vermilion is unique to UL, I just want us to define a unique color. Hence my suggested definition, in between red and orange, but neither.

    By adding a small dab of black to it, as in your photo of the swamp a few posts up, it gives the color some weight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine View Post
    _ That is VIVID.


    On a side note I can't find one historical use of the color Vermilion that is a consistent shade through and through. So for me Vermilion is a range of hues and is not tied down to a single shade or number.

    jmo _
    The Catholic cardinals wear Vermillion. And that's as historical as you can get. So the material is not hard to get.

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    Vermilion Rock Fish

    Vermilion Star Fish

    Vermilion Fly Catcher

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